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Celestes

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BachsFugue

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Celestes

PostWed Oct 15, 2003 2:41 pm

Hello again, folks! In the continuing saga about me and my MIDI organ console, I have nothing new to report other than the fact that I am waiting. Back in August I introduced myself and shared with you news of my purchase of a three-manual and pedal MIDIfied organ console. I am waiting for a new console to be delivered to the church in California from which I purchased the used console. I can do nothing until they get their new console.

In the interim, I enjoy playing Hauptwerk and listening to the Mp3s from all of the new organ samples. The work of Professor Maier with the Silbermann organ and Jiri Zurek with the organ in the monastery of Zlata Koruna in the Czech Republic are quite exciting. The reverberant sound of the monastery organ caused goose bumps while I listened to the examples provided my Mr. Zurek. Thank you all for sharing the wonders of Martin Dyde's Hauptwerk program. Oh, and I do not want to forget the virtual performances of James Pressler. Those performances are outstanding!

I also like to cogitate on what I shall try to accomplish once I have my console set up to play through Hauptwerk. For over thirty-five years I have enjoyed making and revising stop lists and organ tonal specifications. I used to be enamoured of German terminology; recently, though, I am using French. I get a kick out of researching stops online and from my own library. Of course, none of my efforts have been rewarded by realization. But soon I will be able to work on the prize of making a dream come true.

Have I bored you, or put you to sleep yet? I'm a little embarassed about my rambling, but I really love to share my thoughts when it comes to my love of the pipe organ and, now, Hauptwerk. Anyway, I'm ready to present the purpose of this post. All of my citations of "organ stuff" from this point onward references the organ at St. Anne, Mosely.

I am overly fond of celeste stops. The one example on the St. Anne organ isn't enough for me. I don't know what it is about celestes, but I seem to realize a great deal of contentment from that type of sound. I especially love the sound of flute celestes and gemshorn, erzähler, and even soft diapason celestes. (Before any of you recoil in horror, remember: this is my fantasy. (8-) ) My concern here is that if I succeed in making a celeste rank from any of the St. Anne samples, I want them to be done correctly so that with Martin Dyde's permission they will be sharable.

I am using a 30-day trial copy of Sony Sound Forge 7.0. Notice that Sound Forge has been acquired by one of the giants as has Cool Edit Pro (Adobe). I've used the Stereo-StAnnesMoseley-Great-LieblichGedact8 as a test set. I worked on notes 13 to 56. I decided to limit the upward compass of the manuals to the G instead of the C (and the F instead of the G on the pedal) to save memory when loading any organ for my own use. (I don't use the notes 57 to 61 and 31 and 32 even when employing couplers in the music I play. The 56-note compass of the Flentrop organ at Harvard was broad enough with which E. Power Biggs could brilliantly interpret Bach--so why do I need those notes?) (I'm thinking now that the Flentrop may even be a 54-note compass. I don't have any reference at hand to confirm or dispute my failing memory. What I do know is that I can remember that a cover photo on one of my old LPs showed the manuals and they were not 61 notes.)

In Sound Forge I increased the pitch of each note by approximately 2 Hz. (I used an Excel spreadsheet to calculate the number of cents to sharpen each note. I also extended the calculations to 1.5 and 1 Hz in case I decide to make a two-rank celeste that is both sharp and flat.) The result was pleasing, but I'm not sure I liked the new celeste rank playing against the original Lieblich. I tried it against the Swell RohrFlute; I liked the sound better. Since I am not schooled in all the vagaries of voicing, I'm not sure if what I did in mixing two flute types is kosher.

Another question I have regarding the tuning of a celeste rank has to do with the strictness or looseness in keeping to the frequency variance. Should one keep to two beats per second given a 2 Hz variance, or would "about" be acceptable or more aesthetically pleasing?

Any advice or pointers that anyone might offer will be greatly appreciated. I have twenty-nine days left on my free trial of Sound Forge. At US $399.96 I'm not going to purchase Sound Forge anytime soon, so I really need to create all the celestes I want rather quickly. If anyone is interested in my Excel table, I'll email a printable jpeg to you.Hello again, folks! In the continuing saga about me and my MIDI organ console, I have nothing new to report other than the fact that I am waiting. Back in August I introduced myself and shared with you news of my purchase of a three-manual and pedal MIDIfied organ console. I am waiting for a new console to be delivered to the church in California from which I purchased the used console. I can do nothing until they get their new console.

In the interim, I enjoy playing Hauptwerk and listening to the Mp3s from all of the new organ samples. The work of Professor Maier with the Silbermann organ and Jiri Zurek with the organ in the monastery of Zlata Koruna in the Czech Republic are quite exciting. The reverberant sound of the monastery organ caused goose bumps while I listened to the examples provided my Mr. Zurek. Thank you all for sharing the wonders of Martin Dyde's Hauptwerk program. Oh, and I do not want to forget the virtual performances of James Pressler. Those performances are outstanding!

I also like to cogitate on what I shall try to accomplish once I have my console set up to play through Hauptwerk. For over thirty-five years I have enjoyed making and revising stop lists and organ tonal specifications. I used to be enamoured of German terminology; recently, though, I am using French. I get a kick out of researching stops online and from my own library. Of course, none of my efforts have been rewarded by realization. But soon I will be able to work on the prize of making a dream come true.

Have I bored you, or put you to sleep yet? I'm a little embarassed about my rambling, but I really love to share my thoughts when it comes to my love of the pipe organ and, now, Hauptwerk. Anyway, I'm ready to present the purpose of this post. All of my citations of "organ stuff" from this point onward references the organ at St. Anne, Mosely.

I am overly fond of celeste stops. The one example on the St. Anne organ isn't enough for me. I don't know what it is about celestes, but I seem to realize a great deal of contentment from that type of sound. I especially love the sound of flute celestes and gemshorn, erzähler, and even soft diapason celestes. (Before any of you recoil in horror, remember: this is my fantasy. (8-) ) My concern here is that if I succeed in making a celeste rank from any of the St. Anne samples, I want them to be done correctly so that with Martin Dyde's permission they will be sharable.

I am using a 30-day trial copy of Sony Sound Forge 7.0. Notice that Sound Forge has been acquired by one of the giants as has Cool Edit Pro (Adobe). I've used the Stereo-StAnnesMoseley-Great-LieblichGedact8 as a test set. I worked on notes 13 to 56. I decided to limit the upward compass of the manuals to the G instead of the C (and the F instead of the G on the pedal) to save memory when loading any organ for my own use. (I don't use the notes 57 to 61 and 31 and 32 even when employing couplers in the music I play. The 56-note compass of the Flentrop organ at Harvard was broad enough with which E. Power Biggs could brilliantly interpret Bach--so why do I need those notes?) (I'm thinking now that the Flentrop may even be a 54-note compass. I don't have any reference at hand to confirm or dispute my failing memory. What I do know is that I can remember that a cover photo on one of my old LPs showed the manuals and they were not 61 notes.)

In Sound Forge I increased the pitch of each note by approximately 2 Hz. (I used an Excel spreadsheet to calculate the number of cents to sharpen each note. I also extended the calculations to 1.5 and 1 Hz in case I decide to make a two-rank celeste that is both sharp and flat.) The result of my trial effort was pleasing, but I'm not sure I liked the new celeste rank playing against the original Lieblich. I tried it against the Swell RohrFlute; I liked the sound better. Since I am not schooled in all the vagaries of voicing, I'm not sure if what I did in mixing two flute types is kosher.

Another question I have regarding the tuning of a celeste rank has to do with the strictness or looseness in keeping to the frequency variance. Should one keep to two beats per second given a 2 Hz variance, or would "about" be acceptable or more aesthetically pleasing?

Any advice or pointers that anyone might offer will be greatly appreciated. I have twenty-nine days left on my free trial of Sound Forge. At US $399.96 I'm not going to purchase Sound Forge anytime soon, so I really need to create all the celestes I want rather quickly. If anyone is interested in my Excel table, I'll email a printable jpeg to you. (I always check for viruses on email coming in and going out.)

Thanks,
Cole
Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA
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BachsFugue

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PostFri Oct 17, 2003 2:11 am

An update: I've built the flute and gemshorn celestes using 2 and 1.75 Hz values respectively. Both are sounding satisfactorily. The flute celeste is from the Lieblich Gedact rank and plays against the Rohrflute. The gemshorn is made only from the Geigen Principal rank as designed in one of the other user submitted configurations.
Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA
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mdyde

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PostFri Oct 17, 2003 5:15 am

Apparently the Skinner method for celeste tuning was to tune middle C 1 Hz sharp, and then tune the celeste rank in tune with itself, thus the beat frequency increases as you go up the keyboard. I actually prefer that method to a constant frequency increment.

Martin.
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BachsFugue

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PostFri Oct 24, 2003 5:22 am

I tried it, Martin, with very pleasing results.
Thank you,
Cole
Cole Votaw -- Springfield, Ohio, USA
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8ftStop

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PostSat Nov 01, 2003 4:49 am

I am also especially fond of the celeste sound. I am interested in getting the samples you or others produce. I looked on the Hauptwerk user submissions page, and I don't see the one that you referred to in your post. I see other types of stops, but not a celeste. Would you please direct me more specifically to the one referenced in your post, and let me know when the ones you produced are available?
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PostSat Feb 28, 2004 11:05 pm

Hello BachFugue!
Just catching up on my reading of hauptwerk posts incase I missed something . . . and I note that you have cut back the keyboard to 56 notes in order to save that all too precious RAM (O Mighty RAM! how we bow and scrape!). I checked the highest note I am wont to play - Langlais' Chant du Paix - and. . . the final note rings in at that magic number 56. And so I asks, my Precious, wringing my hands, how much Precious RAM might I be saving?
G'day

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