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Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

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Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby flydeltajets » Sun Sep 10, 2017 7:02 pm

Good evening,

Aside from working with an organbuilder, does anyone have a suggestion on how to build the "Skinner" style toe stud bolsters/rails that incline and follow the contour of the pedalboard?

My current pedalboard had toe studs directly mounted on the frame, but I'm trying to replace them with a new style which requires about 1.5" depth into the wood, which in turn requires the bolsters.

I am assuming they are formed as a bent lamination using a mold, and then covered with veneer. However, the shape throws me for a bit of a loop because I'm not familiar with how to bend the wood on two axes at the same time, as well as also creating the incline. Any tips are greatly appreciated!


The links below show some photos similar to my intended design:

http://www.pjmorgans.com/wp-content/upl ... _2_rev.jpg

http://database.organsociety.org/photos ... 160254.jpg

http://database.organsociety.org/photos ... 100507.jpg
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby scottherbert » Sun Sep 10, 2017 8:44 pm

Are you looking to build yourself?

~S
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby flydeltajets » Sun Sep 10, 2017 9:19 pm

If I can figure out how to make the bends/profile, I would like to build it myself to keep costs down...the cost from a builder is considerable.
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby johnh » Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:34 pm

flydeltajets wrote:I am assuming they are formed as a bent lamination using a mold, and then covered with veneer. However, the shape throws me for a bit of a loop because I'm not familiar with how to bend the wood on two axes at the same time, as well as also creating the incline.


On Moller consoles the bolsters are made of laminated wood with veneer. The knee panel is curved as is the top of the pedalboard so they are curved in two 'directions'. I've also seen them hogged out of a piece of solid timber. The required profile is traced on square stock and then shaped on a bandsaw. Depending on the style of toe studs used it can also be challenging to drill the clearance holes for the studs...

----john.
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby jerrynazard » Mon Sep 11, 2017 12:51 am

I have made several sets from solid wood. Trace the concave profile from the front of your pedalboard onto a piece of plywood, and cut that to make a template of your curve. Layout the lines on your stock and cut on the bandsaw. It's tedious work. I would suggest first making a mockup using styrofoam or glued-up blanks of inexpensive softwood and practicing all the cuts a few times. Good luck!
-Jerry
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby johnstump_organist » Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:08 am

This is the sort of thing that I sometimes wonder if 3D printing won't someday provide a solution for. Although, printed out of plastic would take away the artisan quality of a console, not to say the "fun" /challenge of making them.
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby jerrynazard » Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:17 am

John,

That's a valid point you make there. Black plastic rubbed out with 4-dot steel wool looks enough like ebony to satisfy many people - especially faced with the task of actually making toe stud blocks out of real hardwood. In a functioning organ shop, using already available templates and machine setups, the blocks are probably not that difficult to produce. For a one-off build in a conventional woodshop, they are a pain in the patoot.

-Jerry
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby 1961TC4ME » Mon Sep 11, 2017 4:26 pm

I've done quite a lot of woodworking, bending wood was something I've looked in to a few times but never attempted. I used to work with a carpenter back in the day that was quite good at it. There's a few different methods. The first method is the wood is laminated together in thin bendable layers, the layers are glued together all at once and are then clampled against a form. Once the glue is dry the piece or pieces are cut to exact size and finished. The second and most likely used method seen in your examples is the wood is steam bent. Look up wood steam boxes, that will give you an idea of how it's done. I'd assume Skinner had a form already made up, likely out of steel or iron, they would steam the wood until pliable, then clamp to the form until it was dry, then cut and finish the exact profile from there. As mentioned, it's without a doubt fairly tedious work and may require a few practice attempts first.

Marc
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby scottherbert » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:59 pm

jerrynazard wrote:I have made several sets from solid wood. Trace the concave profile from the front of your pedalboard onto a piece of plywood, and cut that to make a template of your curve. Layout the lines on your stock and cut on the bandsaw. It's tedious work. I would suggest first making a mockup using styrofoam or glued-up blanks of inexpensive softwood and practicing all the cuts a few times. Good luck!
-Jerry


Jerry, you beat me to it! Matching the curve is the secret. Using templates and transferring those curves to your stock material. You can try gluing several layers of plywood together, or perhaps poplar, and cut on a bandsaw as Jerry said. Sand to your proper shape, and cover with the veneer of your choice. I made a lot of my stuff in an apartment with a jigsaw! If you follow the lines and take it slow, even that can work!

~S
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby 1961TC4ME » Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:19 pm

Look up how to make a wood bending form, all kinds of videos and info on the internet.

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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby flydeltajets » Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:15 pm

Thanks everyone for the tips! Lots of good advice here!
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby organtechnology » Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:07 am

There is also a way to cut the shapes out as blanks slightly larger than the final size and then clamping an exact size template to it and use a router trim the crude piece to the same size as the template piece.
You can use a router table and or hand held router. The secret is the bit with the bearing that rides on the template.

Happy flying chips,

Thomas

scottherbert wrote:
jerrynazard wrote:I have made several sets from solid wood. Trace the concave profile from the front of your pedalboard onto a piece of plywood, and cut that to make a template of your curve. Layout the lines on your stock and cut on the bandsaw. It's tedious work. I would suggest first making a mockup using styrofoam or glued-up blanks of inexpensive softwood and practicing all the cuts a few times. Good luck!
-Jerry


Jerry, you beat me to it! Matching the curve is the secret. Using templates and transferring those curves to your stock material. You can try gluing several layers of plywood together, or perhaps poplar, and cut on a bandsaw as Jerry said. Sand to your proper shape, and cover with the veneer of your choice. I made a lot of my stuff in an apartment with a jigsaw! If you follow the lines and take it slow, even that can work!

~S
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby NickNelson » Tue Sep 12, 2017 5:29 am

1961TC4ME wrote:Look up how to make a wood bending form, all kinds of videos and info on the internet.


Or maybe see if there's a traditional boat builder in your area - they're always making lengths of wood into odd shapes (usually by steaming and clamping).

Nick
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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby 1961TC4ME » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:04 pm

NickNelson wrote:Or maybe see if there's a traditional boat builder in your area - they're always making lengths of wood into odd shapes (usually by steaming and clamping).

Nick


You know, that is a good point, that or see if maybe there's a cabinet shop in the area that could make the pieces for you. One thing I always look at when it comes to things like this is: Would it be worth the work to set yourself up for what would likely end up being a one time project in order to bend a couple pieces of wood as it may be just as easy to find someone to do it for you?

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Re: Toe Stud Bolsters (Wood-working)

Postby engrssc » Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:04 pm

1961TC4ME wrote:Would it be worth the work to set yourself up for what would likely end up being a one time project in order to bend a couple pieces of wood as it may be just as easy to find someone to do it for you?


and miss the frustration :wink: (and joy) of a DIY project that every time you look at it gives that special feeling of pride. 8)

Rgds,
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