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Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby Erzahler » Tue May 30, 2017 9:20 pm

I have 3 manuals and find assigning floating divisions something I have left in the too hard basket to date but I'll see if I can apply all of the helpful instructions above. At present with Salisbury for example I have the Solo playable on the Choir manual but that obviously has limitations and is only part of the solution.
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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby Randall Mullin » Tue May 30, 2017 11:05 pm

Just imagine the organ settings/keyboards screen for floating divisions looking like this. This is three columns.

Choose One ||||||||||||||||||Drop Menu. ||||||||||||Drop Menu
Solo Division. ||||||||||||||Keyboard 4. |||||||||||||Button 4
Swell Division. |||||||||||||Keyboard 3. ||||||||||||||Button 3
Great Division. |||||||||||||Keyboard 2. ||||||||||||||Button 2
Choir Division. |||||||||||||||Keyboard 1. ||||||||||||||Button 1

Save Button

Select one from the first column, then choose items from the two drop down menus.
Your saved selections appear below:
Choir Division plays on Keyboard 1 when Button 1 is pressed
Choir Division plays on Keyboard 2 when Button 2 is pressed
Great Division plays on Keyboard 2 when Button 1 is pressed
Great Division plays on Keyboard 1 when Button 2 is pressed

Your Great/Choir Transfer complete.

No translation necessary
Last edited by Randall Mullin on Wed May 31, 2017 6:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby mdyde » Wed May 31, 2017 4:26 am

Hello Randall,

Yes -- as I mentioned, we do have an enhancement request logged for adding a new, dedicated screen for configuring floating divisions, which would be based on a grid and designed specifically to be as easy to use and understand as possible.
Best regards,
Martin.

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby gbetzner » Thu Jun 01, 2017 10:10 am

I have developed my own method of using a 4 manual and pedal SET with a 3 keyboard and pedal PHYSICAL organ using the Floating system.
My basic idea is to keep the standard keyboard arrangement of many organs with the keyboard set up of
Choir, Great, Swell, Solo, Pedal. On each of the Floating Division Routes (RT) 1 through 4, I drop one manual starting from top (Solo) downward. This keeps the manuals in essentially the same order.
Thus FDR-1 Choir, Great, Swell, Pedal (Solo omitted)
FDR-2 Choir, Great, Solo, Pedal (Swell omitted)
FDR-3 Choir, Swell, Solo, Pedal (Great omitted)
FDR-4 Great, Swell, Solo, Pedal (Choir omitted)
When setting up the divisions (DV's) starting with the lowest PHYSICAL keyboard as DV-1, middle DV-2
and top as DV-3 with Pedal as DV-4
Having set up the divisions, Then the keyboards set up under inputs as follows:
Input 1;
Choir DV-1 - RT-1
Great DV-2 - RT-1 (Solo omitted(
Swell DV-3 - RT-1
Pedal DV-4 - RT-1

Input 2;
Choir DV-1 - RT-2
Great DV-2 - RT-2 (Swell omitted)
Solo DV-3 - RT-2
Pedal DV-4 - RT-2

Input 3;
Choir DV-1 - RT-3
Swell DV-2 - RT-3 (Great omitted)
Solo DV-3 - RT-3
Pedal DV-4 - RT-3

Input 4;
Great DV-1 - RT-4
Swell DV-2 - RT-4 (Choir omitted)
Solo DV-3 - RT-4
Pedal DV-4 - RT-4

Thus it keeps the keyboards relatively organized and omitts one keyboard descending from top down.
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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby Randall Mullin » Thu Jun 01, 2017 6:25 pm

First of all, thank you all again for your willingness to try to help me understand the Organ Settings/Keyboards (Floating Divisions) dialog. I think I have discovered the reasons for my lack of comprehension.

As some of you may know, I am a professional organist. In the organ world several of the terms are defined differently from in the Hauptwerk world.

Here are the terms as organists understand them:

Keyboard = a piece of hardware that has 61 keys. This is what the organist "plays."

Virtual Keyboard = is a pictorial representation of the 61 key hardware.

Division = a group of stops (knobs or tabs) under a heading (usually, Choir, Great, Swell and Solo(Echo))

A Floating Division = a group of stops under a heading that can be assigned to any Keyboard.
_____________________________________________________________________________

In the Hauptwerk world, on the Organ Settings/Keyboard (Floating Divisions) screen

Virtual Keyboard = Division
Floating Division = Keyboard

_____________________________________________________________________________

Now in addition to the above reversals, you include Route and Input into equation.

My understanding of Route = Button on the Floating Divisions large control panel.

That leaves Input: As I understand it now, an Input is a container for both a keyboard and a button.
___________________________________________________________________________

With this understanding in mind, and after having followed Martin's directions for the spreadsheet mentioned in a previous message, I have translated all of this into an organist's language.

The divisions are listed in standard keyboard order and the standard order is assigned to Button 1, which is also Primary Input.
____________________________________________________________________________
----------------------------|--Primary Input----|--Input 2-----------|--Input 3--------------|--Input 4
----------------------------|----------------------- |-----------------------|------------------------|----------------------
Solo Div.----------------|--Keyboard 4-------|----------------------|---------------------- -|-----------------------
----------------------------|--Button 1-----------|----------------------|-------------------------|-----------------------
----------------------------|------------------------|----------------------|-------------------------|-----------------------
Swell Div.---------------|--Keyboard 3-------|----------------------|--Keyboard 2-------|-----------------------
----------------------------|--Button 1-----------|----------------------|--Button 3------------|----------------------
----------------------------|-------------------------|---------------------|-------------------------|----------------------
Great Div.-------------- |--Keyboard 2-------|--Keyboard 1----|--Keyboard 1--------|----------------------
----------------------------|--Button 1------------|--Button 2--------|--Button 3------------|----------------------
----------------------------|-------------------------|---------------------|--------------------------|----------------------
Choir Div.---------------|--Keyboard 1--------|--Keyboard 2----|--Keyboard 1--------|----------------------
----------------------------|--Button 1------------|--Button 2---------|--Button 3-----------|----------------------

My understanding is that this setup gives you a Great/Choir transfer using buttons 1 and 2.

When button 3 is pressed the swell division will play on keyboard 2 and the Choir and Great will play on Keyboard 1. Preparing an organist to play a two manual console when practicing on a three manual organ.

If I have made mistakes, would you please use my terminology to correct me. Of course, after the scheme is set, it will all be translated back into Hauptwerk's definitions for entering the information into the dialog box.
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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby mdyde » Fri Jun 02, 2017 8:06 am

Hello Randall,

Randall Mullin wrote:Here are the terms as organists understand them:

Keyboard = a piece of hardware that has 61 keys. This is what the organist "plays."

Virtual Keyboard = is a pictorial representation of the 61 key hardware.

Division = a group of stops (knobs or tabs) under a heading (usually, Choir, Great, Swell and Solo(Echo))

A Floating Division = a group of stops under a heading that can be assigned to any Keyboard.


I would partly disagree with your definition of 'virtual keyboard', in that Hauptwerk models a real pipe organ, and (within the scope of the functionality that the real pipe organ provides) there's a one-to-one correspondence between the pipe organ's functionality and the functionality and terminology within Hauptwerk. Just prefix the organ terminology by 'virtual' to give the terminology within Hauptwerk's model of that part of the real organ.

For example, a 'virtual keyboard' is simply Hauptwerk's logical model of the real organ's keyboard (including its functionality). It's usually visible on the screen, but its visibility isn't the defining factor -- it can still exist and function without actually being visible (although most sample sets do make their virtual keyboards visible, for convenience and aesthetics).

Likewise a 'virtual division' is Hauptwerk's logical model of the real organ's division (including its functionality). A virtual division may be played from a virtual keyboard (e.g. by clicking in its keys, if displayed), just like a real organ's division can be played from its real keyboard.

Randall Mullin wrote:In the Hauptwerk world, on the Organ Settings/Keyboard (Floating Divisions) screen

Virtual Keyboard = Division
Floating Division = Keyboard


Hauptwerk's 'floating division MIDI keyboard' functionality is an extension to what real pipe organs provide (purely for the purposes of allowing virtual models of larger pipe organs to be played from the more-limited number of physical MIDI keyboards that people might have).

The full term for that part of Hauptwerk functionality is 'floating division MIDI keyboard' (as used on the 'Organ settings | Advanced ... | Floating division MIDI keyboards' screen, for example), although in some parts of Hauptwerk the term is abbreviated to 'floating division' to fit it on the screen, particularly in places where it's expected to be obvious that the term is referring specifically to the 'floating division MIDI keyboard' functionality (rather than true 'virtual floating divisions', i.e. precise virtual models of a real organ's floating divisions), such as in the left-hand browse list on the 'Organ settings | Advanced ... | Floating division MIDI keyboards' screen.

Randall Mullin wrote:In the Hauptwerk world, on the Organ Settings/Keyboard (Floating Divisions) screen

Virtual Keyboard = Division


Not quite; see my explanations for 'virtual keyboard' and 'virtual divisions' (and the term 'virtual' in general) above.

The 'floating division MIDI keyboard functionality' allows 'floating division MIDI keyboards' to be routed (via 'routes') to the virtual organ's 'virtual keyboards' (defined as above).

Randall Mullin wrote:Now in addition to the above reversals, you include Route and Input into equation.

My understanding of Route = Button on the Floating Divisions large control panel.


Broadly, yes: a button can select a route (although, strictly speaking, it isn't true to say that they are exactly 'the same'), and each route does have its own unique button to select it. (However, routes can also be selected by other means, such as the arrow buttons that increment/decrement the selected route.)

Randall Mullin wrote:That leaves Input: As I understand it now, an Input is a container for both a keyboard and a button.


Broadly, yes, when referring specifically to configuring floating division MIDI keyboards: an 'input' on the screen could be said to be a container for a floating division MIDI keyboard, and the route.

(However, the keyboard settings screen can do other things with its 'input' too, such as direct MIDI input.)
Best regards,
Martin.

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby mdyde » Fri Jun 02, 2017 8:24 am

Randall Mullin wrote:With this understanding in mind, and after having followed Martin's directions for the spreadsheet mentioned in a previous message, I have translated all of this into an organist's language.

The divisions are listed in standard keyboard order and the standard order is assigned to Button 1, which is also Primary Input.
____________________________________________________________________________
----------------------------|--Primary Input----|--Input 2-----------|--Input 3--------------|--Input 4
----------------------------|----------------------- |-----------------------|------------------------|----------------------
Solo Div.----------------|--Keyboard 4-------|----------------------|---------------------- -|-----------------------
----------------------------|--Button 1-----------|----------------------|-------------------------|-----------------------
----------------------------|------------------------|----------------------|-------------------------|-----------------------
Swell Div.---------------|--Keyboard 3-------|----------------------|--Keyboard 2-------|-----------------------
----------------------------|--Button 1-----------|----------------------|--Button 3------------|----------------------
----------------------------|-------------------------|---------------------|-------------------------|----------------------
Great Div.-------------- |--Keyboard 2-------|--Keyboard 1----|--Keyboard 1--------|----------------------
----------------------------|--Button 1------------|--Button 2--------|--Button 3------------|----------------------
----------------------------|-------------------------|---------------------|--------------------------|----------------------
Choir Div.---------------|--Keyboard 1--------|--Keyboard 2----|--Keyboard 1--------|----------------------
----------------------------|--Button 1------------|--Button 2---------|--Button 3-----------|----------------------

My understanding is that this setup gives you a Great/Choir transfer using buttons 1 and 2.

When button 3 is pressed the swell division will play on keyboard 2 and the Choir and Great will play on Keyboard 1. Preparing an organist to play a two manual console when practicing on a three manual organ.


Currently you seem have that set up to use four MIDI keyboards (not three), which presumably isn't what you intended? Do you mean that you want to use three MIDI keyboards, with one of them permanently playing the virtual Solo keyboard?

Also, do you mean that you want to have just four route selection buttons which control the routes for all floating division MIDI keyboards simultaneously, i.e. using the 'all divisions' (an abbreviation for 'all floating division MIDI keyboards') route selection buttons on the control panel, rather the having buttons to control the routes of the individual MIDI keyboards?
Best regards,
Martin.

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby Randall Mullin » Sat Jun 03, 2017 7:27 pm

Hello Martin,

First of all, I want to thank you for your patience with me. Please believe me when I tell you that I am not doing this just for myself, but for other organists who want an easy way to have a Great/Choir transfer in their Hauptwerk setup.

Previously, in my tutorial, I simply gave people the instructions and said follow them. I did not understand the instructions and learned by trial and error. Many of them would not understand them either and would not have the patience to even attempt to try. However, most people can follow simple instructions, if they know by doing so that they can have their Great/Choir transfer.

My aim in all of this is to attempt to understand on a very basic level how this works and to communicate this understanding to other organists specifically as to this particular dialog box as it relates the Floating Divisions large control panel. Most organists, including myself, will simply not comprehend the complete definitions of Hauptwerk terminology as you have defined them in your post.

In the short term, the ideal would be to find people who have an engineering orientation who also understand how organists think and who are interested in translating this in the most basic form for fellow organists. Luckily, at this point, there are persons like Francois Ratte, perhaps a few others, and, on a more primary level, me. Francois Ratte even has to use an app to control a "client's" computer because they have found Hauptwerk too complex to even deal with the basics.

Organists understand Keyboard, Division and Button without translation, because these are found on most organ consoles. (Notice I did not use pistons because that would require a further definition.)

As I have already mentioned, the dialog box in question could be "simplified" into a system of drop down menus.
The goal, as I understand it is to allow a person to
1. assign any division to any keyboard and
2. assign multiple divisions to any keyboard.
3. This is controlled by buttons.

With single drop down menus for a keyboard and single drop down menus for buttons, all that remains is multiple drop down menus for Divisions (one for each division) or a single drop down with all of the possible choices of divisions which could be assigned to a single keyboard. Any organist could understand this.

At this point, I am dealing with the dialog box as it exists today and translating it into as simple a form as possible using the three terms (division, keyboard, button). Many organists will have trouble with the terms "Input" and "Route." In this case, they will simply have to copy the directions that I would supply. However, with my spreadsheet (in my last post), I think that most organists could see the connection between division and keyboard, and see the connection between route and button so that they could come up with their own scheme, if necessary.

I have only included items in my spreadsheet that relate to the two issues at hand:

To accomplish the Great/Choir transfer, the Swell and Solo can be permanently assigned to their respective (normal) keyboards with the keyboard assignment in the Organ Settings/Keyboards dialog using Auto-Detect.
Only Great and Choir have to use the Keyboards/Floating Divisions dialog.

In the second scenario, for the Swell Division to play on Keyboard 2 (for a three manual console to simulate a two manual console) the Swell Division would also have to be defined in the Keyboards/ Floating Division dialog.

This is all that I have attempted to show in the spreadsheet.

If this approach accomplishes the task then I will be happy. If you can shed more light on this issue using the terms Division, Keyboard and Button in the most basic way (as I have defined them) and as related to these two issues (Great/Swell transfer) and (Swell to Keyboard 2 with Great and Choir on Keyboard 1) I would welcome it.

Gratefully,

Randall
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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby mdyde » Sun Jun 04, 2017 5:44 am

Randall Mullin wrote:Francois Ratte even has to use an app to control a "client's" computer because they have found Hauptwerk too complex to even deal with the basics.


I think it's important to bear in mind that Hauptwerk is a computer program after all, and one that relies on computer hardware, MIDI hardware and audio hardware, so one does inherently need to have a certain level of understanding of how to use those things. In most areas, I think Hauptwerk is about as easy as it could reasonably be to configure and use (short of actually supplying it as a complete preconfigured hardware digital organ console). (The main exceptions are probably audio routing and the floating division MIDI keyboards, which, as I've said, we do plan to address in the future.) As far as I know most of the help that Francois provides to people is with their computer and MIDI hardware, as well helping people who have limited previous experience with computers or MIDI. That's true of the support that we provide too. That isn't a fault of Hauptwerk per-se -- it's the nature of the fact that it's a computer program, and one that requires computer, MIDI and audio hardware.

Randall Mullin wrote:As I have already mentioned, the dialog box in question could be "simplified" into a system of drop down menus.
The goal, as I understand it is to allow a person to
1. assign any division to any keyboard and
2. assign multiple divisions to any keyboard.
3. This is controlled by buttons.

With single drop down menus for a keyboard and single drop down menus for buttons, all that remains is multiple drop down menus for Divisions (one for each division) or a single drop down with all of the possible choices of divisions which could be assigned to a single keyboard. Any organist could understand this.


As I mentioned previously, we do indeed aim to add a new dedicated screen to make it easy to use and understand in the future, and we know it would be a feature that many people would appreciate. I know exactly how the screen would be designed; it's just a question of having the time/manpower for that development work (as with any other enhancements), in addition to the support that we provide.

Randall Mullin wrote:At this point, I am dealing with the dialog box as it exists today and translating it into as simple a form as possible using the three terms (division, keyboard, button). Many organists will have trouble with the terms "Input" and "Route."
...
If you can shed more light on this issue using the terms Division, Keyboard and Button in the most basic way (as I have defined them)


I don't think the terms you're trying to use (division, keyboard, button) are sufficient or logically correct, and trying to define it just in terms of those would be misleading (a significant over-simplification), adding to any confusion, rather than helping to clarify it. Three terms alone aren't enough for the logical model. I think the terms you need to use, and which somebody needs to understand conceptually, in order to be able to use the functionality are:

- 'Virtual organ keyboard'. (The sample set's Swell, Solo, Great, Choir, Pedal, etc.)
- 'MIDI keyboard'. (A physical keyboard, i.e. physical manual or the pedalboard, on your MIDI organ console.)
- '(Virtual) floating division MIDI keyboard'. (A thing you can configure any one of your MIDI keyboards to control, in order to be able to flip the MIDI keyboard's assignment amongst several 'virtual organ keyboards' in real-time, whilst playing.)
- '(Virtual) floating division MIDI keyboard route'. (One of up to four mappings, numbered 1-4, that you define from each '(virtual) floating division MIDI keyboard' to 'virtual organ keyboards' which you can then select in real-time, whilst playing, using buttons/pistons).

Randall Mullin wrote:To accomplish the Great/Choir transfer, the Swell and Solo can be permanently assigned to their respective (normal) keyboards with the keyboard assignment in the Organ Settings/Keyboards dialog using Auto-Detect.
Only Great and Choir have to use the Keyboards/Floating Divisions dialog.

In the second scenario, for the Swell Division to play on Keyboard 2 (for a three manual console to simulate a two manual console) the Swell Division would also have to be defined in the Keyboards/ Floating Division dialog.


I'm not clear why you would want to try to combine those two scenarios?: The MIDI settings are per-virtual-organ anyway, so you could set things up differently for a virtual organ with two manuals, compared to one with three manuals, for example. Also, your physical MIDI organ console would either have two physical manuals or three. Hence there wouldn't seem to be a need to switch in real-time (whilst playing) between catering either for different numbers of virtual manuals, or for different numbers of physical manuals -- the virtual organ that you have loaded, and the topology of your physical MIDI organ console, determine those things.
Best regards,
Martin.

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby Randall Mullin » Mon Jun 05, 2017 6:01 pm

Dear Martin,

I think that I have described how organists think and with what terms and definitions they are comfortable when dealing with any size pipe organ/digital organ console.

In my example of a different dialog box for floating divisions, I have given one possible snapshot of what would give organists the ability to combine divisions, keyboards, and buttons so that they could understand what they were doing in the process. This is by no means a suggestion on how you or your engineers should deal with this issue. I am sure, when the new dialog box is created in the future it will be as self explanatory as your wonderful implementation of Auto-Detect.

Now to the buttons and how I implement them.

I use the Haverhill OIC sample set for the majority of my practice.

To explain how I use three buttons from the Floating Divisions Mini Control Panel with the Haverhill OIC sample set, I will give the following description:

Button 1 gives me Choir, Great and Swell Divisions playing on Keyboards 1, 2, 3, respectively. This is my standard set up, which I use the vast majority of the time.

Button 2 gives me Choir, Great and Swell Divisions playing on Keyboards 2, 1, 3 respectively. I would choose this when rehearsing any compositions by French Romantic composers.

Button 3 gives me Choir and Great Divisions playing on Keyboard 1 and Swell Division playing on keyboard 2. I would use this Button when playing my setup in preparation to play a concert on a 2 manual organ.

I would not be switching these buttons during a piece, only between pieces. With this system of buttons I am able to simulate different organ consoles without changing sample sets.

As I have mentioned the 4th Keyboard is not involved in these arrangements.
_______________________________________________________________________________

Yesterday (Sunday), I was reminded yet again of this incredible computer program that you have given to the organists' community. On Sundays at St. Luke's Cathedral in Portland, Maine, I accompany the choir playing a 4 manual E. M. Skinner organ for a weekly Eucharist and monthly Evensong. I am able to accomplish this by practicing there between 30 and 45 minutes a week.

This is only possible because my 4 manual Hauptwerk setup is designed to completely emulate this console in almost every detail. Even the height of the bench is the same.

When I first considered a Hauptwerk setup all I envisioned was a practice organ.
When I discovered the realism and quality of the sounds involved, the incredible flexibility that Hauptwerk gave me to switch keyboards, switch piston orientations, make adjustments to the sounds of individual notes or entire ranks, and the ease of creating recordings, I realized that this furnished me with the power to create videos for YouTube in my home using a laptop computer and my Hauptwerk tower computer. After the initial outlay of funds for the Hauptwerk setup, two video cameras and laptop computer with video editing software, regardless of how many videos I make, there is no additional cost to me. I began this when most people did not take YouTube seriously. I got the idea of creating the videos from Rob Stefanussen who had demonstrated previously that the quality provided by Hauptwerk sample sets coupled with the improved audio quality available on YouTube made this an acceptable recording platform. 

After I posted my first videos I began to receive PDF copies of music from composers for consideration. One of these composers was Paul Ayres. When I approached this London based composer about making a YouTube video of one of his pieces, he wondered why I would bother. Now after having created 70 YouTube videos of numerous composers on Hauptwerk, I recently received a note from Paul Ayres thanking me for exposing his organ music "to the world." When you "Google" the term "Paul Ayres Composer" a picture of my video of his "Toccata on 'All you need is love'" is found in the list and the video has been viewed over 19,000 times. This is a recording of a piece by a composer that is not that well known viewed by a small subset of the classical music audience with an interest in the organ.

Now also keep in mind that this video, and 69 others like it, was recorded by a retired 69 year old organist living in a village of 6000 inhabitants in Southern Maine, who was initially interested only in obtaining a reasonably priced practice instrument.

Through YouTube and Hauptwerk, others like Carson Cooman have also exposed the classical music world to the work of countless relatively obscure composers.

Needless to say, each one of these videos, when identified as a Hauptwerk recording, is an advertisement for Hauptwerk to the organ enthusiasts of the world.

You, Martin Dyde, make this possible. The word "gratitude" does not even begin to cover my appreciation for your gift to the organists of the world!

Randall
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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby mdyde » Tue Jun 06, 2017 6:47 am

Hello Randall,

Randall Mullin wrote:When I first considered a Hauptwerk setup all I envisioned was a practice organ.
When I discovered the realism and quality of the sounds involved, the incredible flexibility that Hauptwerk gave me to switch keyboards, switch piston orientations, make adjustments to the sounds of individual notes or entire ranks, and the ease of creating recordings, I realized that this furnished me with the power to create videos for YouTube in my home using a laptop computer and my Hauptwerk tower computer. After the initial outlay of funds for the Hauptwerk setup, two video cameras and laptop computer with video editing software, regardless of how many videos I make, there is no additional cost to me. I began this when most people did not take YouTube seriously. I got the idea of creating the videos from Rob Stefanussen who had demonstrated previously that the quality provided by Hauptwerk sample sets coupled with the improved audio quality available on YouTube made this an acceptable recording platform.

After I posted my first videos I began to receive PDF copies of music from composers for consideration. One of these composers was Paul Ayres. When I approached this London based composer about making a YouTube video of one of his pieces, he wondered why I would bother. Now after having created 70 YouTube videos of numerous composers on Hauptwerk, I recently received a note from Paul Ayres thanking me for exposing his organ music "to the world." When you "Google" the term "Paul Ayres Composer" a picture of my video of his "Toccata on 'All you need is love'" is found in the list and the video has been viewed over 19,000 times. This is a recording of a piece by a composer that is not that well known viewed by a small subset of the classical music audience with an interest in the organ.

Now also keep in mind that this video, and 69 others like it, was recorded by a retired 69 year old organist living in a village of 6000 inhabitants in Southern Maine, who was initially interested only in obtaining a reasonably priced practice instrument.

Through YouTube and Hauptwerk, others like Carson Cooman have also exposed the classical music world to the work of countless relatively obscure composers.

Needless to say, each one of these videos, when identified as a Hauptwerk recording, is an advertisement for Hauptwerk to the organ enthusiasts of the world.

You, Martin Dyde, make this possible. The word "gratitude" does not even begin to cover my appreciation for your gift to the organists of the world!


Thanks very much for the enthusiasm and support. It's much appreciated, and glad you're finding it so useful.

Randall Mullin wrote:I think that I have described how organists think and with what terms and definitions they are comfortable when dealing with any size pipe organ/digital organ console.

In my example of a different dialog box for floating divisions, I have given one possible snapshot of what would give organists the ability to combine divisions, keyboards, and buttons so that they could understand what they were doing in the process.


In order to understand it properly, I think it's critical to understand the difference between, and to distinguish between, what is 'physical' and what is 'virtual'. For example, if you were to try to explain it to somebody using just the term 'keyboard' then it would be ambiguous, since you could be referring either to the physical (MIDI) keyboard or to the virtual keyboard (as shown on the screen). They're fundamentally different, and can behave differently. (There's isn't necessarily a one-to-one mapping between them, for example.)

Likewise, I think it's critical to understand that what the floating division MIDI input mechanism does is:

1. Map 'physical (MIDI) keyboards' to 'virtual keyboards'. (Correct).

... not:

2. Map 'physical (MIDI) keyboards' to 'divisions' (real or virtual). (Incorrect).

(Aside from the real vs. virtual distinction), there's a fundamental difference because if one were (incorrectly) to think that one was mapping a physical MIDI keyboard to a virtual division then one wouldn't expect the virtual division's couplers to have an effect, whereas they do have an effect because the mapping is to (virtual) keyboards (not divisions). For example, if one tried to understand the concept in terms of 2 above (incorrect), and if one currently had the physical MIDI keyboard mapped to the virtual Great, and also had the Swell to Great coupler drawn, then one wouldn't expect the Swell division to play, whereas in fact it will play (because you're playing the virtual Great keyboard, rather than playing the virtual Great division directly).
Best regards,
Martin.

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby mdyde » Tue Jun 06, 2017 7:44 am

Randall Mullin wrote:Now to the buttons and how I implement them.

I use the Haverhill OIC sample set for the majority of my practice.

To explain how I use three buttons from the Floating Divisions Mini Control Panel with the Haverhill OIC sample set, I will give the following description:

Button 1 gives me Choir, Great and Swell Divisions playing on Keyboards 1, 2, 3, respectively. This is my standard set up, which I use the vast majority of the time.

Button 2 gives me Choir, Great and Swell Divisions playing on Keyboards 2, 1, 3 respectively. I would choose this when rehearsing any compositions by French Romantic composers.

Button 3 gives me Choir and Great Divisions playing on Keyboard 1 and Swell Division playing on keyboard 2. I would use this Button when playing my setup in preparation to play a concert on a 2 manual organ.

I would not be switching these buttons during a piece, only between pieces. With this system of buttons I am able to simulate different organ consoles without changing sample sets.

As I have mentioned the 4th Keyboard is not involved in these arrangements.


Thanks for the clarification. Using three physical (MIDI) manuals for playing a single general-purpose three-manual virtual organ for the purposes of simulating playing different real pipes organs with different numbers and orders of physical manuals certainly makes sense, e.g. for travelling concert organists wishing to practice (although I think it's probably rather an uncommon requirement).

[Assuming that you want to use the 'All divisions' route selector functions/buttons to select the routes for all of the floating division MIDI keyboards simultaneously:]

To work out how to configure that particular scheme, using the method I described previously, you would have the following for the first grid/spreadsheet:

- Row 1, which represents floating division MIDI keyboard 1 (which you would auto-detect to your lowest physical MIDI keyboard):
- - Column 1 (=route 1 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Choir
- - Column 2 (=route 2 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Great
- - Column 3 (=route 3 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Choir
- - Column 4 (=route 4 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): [empty, since you'll only be using three routes]

- Row 2, which represents floating division MIDI keyboard 2 (which you would auto-detect to your middle physical MIDI keyboard):
- - Column 1 (=route 1 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Great
- - Column 2 (=route 2 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Choir
- - Column 3 (=route 3 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Swell
- - Column 4 (=route 4 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): [empty, since you'll only be using three routes]

- Row 3, which represents floating division MIDI keyboard 3 (which you would auto-detect to your top physical MIDI keyboard):
- - Column 1 (=route 1 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Swell
- - Column 2 (=route 2 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Swell
- - Column 3 (=route 3 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): [empty]
- - Column 4 (=route 4 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): [empty, since you'll only be using three routes]

- Row 4, which represents floating division MIDI keyboard 4 (which you would also need to auto-detect to your lowest physical MIDI keyboard, since for one of your routes you want two virtual keyboards to play from the same physical MIDI keyboard):
- - Column 1 (=route 1 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): [empty]
- - Column 2 (=route 2 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): [empty]
- - Column 3 (=route 3 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): Great
- - Column 4 (=route 4 for that floating division MIDI keyboard): [empty, since you'll only be using three routes]

You would then use that information to populate the second grid/spreadsheet as follows:

- Row 1, which represents the virtual Choir keyboard:
- - Column 1 (=settings screen input tab 1): 'floating division 1, route 1'.
- - Column 2 (=settings screen input tab 2): 'floating division 1, route 3'.
- - Column 3 (=settings screen input tab 3): 'floating division 2, route 2'.
- - Column 4 (=settings screen input tab 4): [empty]

- Row 2, which represents the virtual Great keyboard:
- - Column 1 (=settings screen input tab 1): 'floating division 1, route 2'.
- - Column 2 (=settings screen input tab 2): 'floating division 2, route 1'.
- - Column 3 (=settings screen input tab 3): 'floating division 4, route 3'.
- - Column 4 (=settings screen input tab 4): [empty]

- Row 3, which represents the virtual Swell keyboard:
- - Column 1 (=settings screen input tab 1): 'floating division 2, route 3'.
- - Column 2 (=settings screen input tab 2): 'floating division 3, route 1'.
- - Column 3 (=settings screen input tab 3): 'floating division 3, route 2'.
- - Column 4 (=settings screen input tab 4): [empty]

Those are the values that you would select for each of the virtual keyboards on each of the 'Input N' screen tabs on the 'Organ settings | Keyboards' screen (assuming I haven't made any mistakes!).

I hope that helps.
Best regards,
Martin.

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby evertjan » Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:29 am

Years ago I have made a document for my Hauptwerk friend Luis García about how to configure step by step floating divisions for a sample set with 3 manuals in combination with his organ with 2 keyboards. In the past Luis have mailed this document to many other forum members (on request) and he will do this again in this forum post (see his message on viewtopic.php?p=121579#p121579).

There was a question to publish the document on the forum.
Together with Luis I have updated it for an own organ with 3 manuals, so it's more general now. We also added the definitions Martin has written in his post above. Thanks.

Downloadlink of the PDF: https://goo.gl/2avoVy

Luis and I hope that configuring floating divisions in Hauptwerk can be done by everyone now.

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby mdyde » Tue Jun 13, 2017 4:13 am

Hello Evert-Jan/Luis,

Thanks very much for making that document available. I expected people will find that very useful.
Best regards,
Martin.

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Re: Floating Divisions: Inputs and Routes

Postby IainStinson » Tue Jun 13, 2017 9:17 am

I hope you don't mind my adding a link this thread to the article on using the floating divisions to create a "coupler manual". This allows the use of an otherwise unused keyboard...
http://forum.hauptwerk.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=14765

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